In-depth reviews

Hyundai Ioniq 5 review

With more presence than most supercars, ultra-rapid charging capability and luxury-car-like ride quality and interior comfort, the Hyundai Ioniq 5 is hard to fault

Overall rating

5.0 out of 5

Pros

  • Price
  • Looks
  • Comfort

Cons

  • No rear wiper
  • Fidgety ride over bumps
  • Some rivals have longer range
ModelRangeWallbox charge timeRapid charge time
58kWh RWD240 miles9hrs 15mins (0-100%, 7.4kW)18mins (10-80%, 175kW)
73kWh RWD300 miles11hrs 45mins (0-100%, 7.4kW)18mins (10-80%, 220kW)
73kWh AWD287 miles11hrs 45mins (0-100%, 7.4kW)18mins (10-80%, 220kW)

Hyundai and its sister brand Kia are no strangers to the electric-car market: for years now, they’ve been producing some of the best-value EVs around. But the original Ioniq Electric hatchback and Kona Electric SUV are old news now: the Ioniq 5 has landed, seemingly from outer space.

Unlike its budget-minded siblings, this model has loftier ambitions, with its sights set on the premium electric-car crowd. The Ioniq 5’s rivals include the Audi Q4 e-tron, the Ford Mustang Mach-E and the Tesla Model 3, as well as higher-spec versions of the Volkswagen ID.3. To take them on, Hyundai has given the car class-leading charging technology and made it more of a head-turner than most supercars in the looks department.

Retro-inspired styling is taking over the market at the moment – and we're all for it if it means more creations like this on our roads. But it’s not just the wedge-shaped design, inspired by '70s and '80s hatchbacks, that makes the Ioniq 5 stand out. It also features 20-inch alloys on higher-spec models, as well as cool details like '8-bit' headlights made from 256 individual LED ‘cubes’ – the sort of detail you’d typically see on a concept car.

There's a choice of two battery sizes, as well as rear or four-wheel drive, so you should be able to find the right mix of performance and range you're looking for. Performance is fairly strong, although the Ioniq 5 is not a Tesla-fighting drag racer: comfort and smoothness are the watchwords here. Occasionally fidgety ride aside, the only real negative we can think of for this car is the lack of a rear wiper. That, and the fact that some of its more attention-grabbing features are only available as options on the pricey range-topping model.

Otherwise, it's reasonably priced compared to rivals, starting from just under £37,000 for the entry-level SE Connect and rising to just over £48,000 for Ultimate trim with the biggest battery and four-wheel drive. That's on par with the likes of the Volkswagen ID.4 and what we expect the Tesla Model Y will cost when it arrives on British shores. Plus, the Hyundai frequently undercuts the Audi's Q4 e-tron and Ford's Mustang Mach-E.

Overall, then, the Ioniq 5 is an outstanding electric car that proves to have as much substance as it does style; it's more than worthy of the significant anticipation that had built up ahead of its arrival. Plus, Hyundai has already announced that an Ioniq 6 electric saloon and Ioniq 7 electric SUV are on the way in the next few years – and if they’re even on par with this first offering from the Ioniq sub-brand, premium rivals should definitely be worried. For a more in-depth look at the Hyundai Ioniq 5, read on for the rest of our detailed review...

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