Kia Niro running costs

A Toyota Prius may be a little more economical, but the Niro hybrid still impresses

The sub-£23,500 starting price of the Kia Niro is almost £1,000 less than an entry-level Toyota Prius, but you can spend nearly £3,000 more than the glitziest Prius if you push the boat out on a Niro. You don’t get any money off through the plug-in car grant, but the Niro still looks great value thanks to its high specification – whatever trim level you choose.

Wheel sizes make a small difference to how much company-car tax you’ll pay, as the Benefit-in-Kind rates are 19 and 21% respectively for Niros on 16 and 18-inch wheels. No Niro is clean enough to earn London Congestion Charge exemption, though.

Kia Niro insurance group

The Kia Niro 2 and Niro 4 both have a group 12 insurance rating, but the mid-range Niro 3 is rated higher, in group 14. That may sound odd, but the reason is the Niro 3 has many of the more desirable extras of the Niro 4, but without that car’s standard autonomous emergency braking.

Warranty

The seven-year/100,000-mile warranty handed out by Kia covers the whole car, including its hybrid powertrain. You won’t find better cover on any rival.

Servicing

The Kia Niro has 10,000-mile service intervals, or requires annual servicing if you don’t drive far enough. Costs will be reasonable, with Kia offering a three-year all-inclusive deal at around £450.

Road tax

As none of the Kia Niro range cross the £40,000 threshold, road tax is just £130 per year.

Depreciation

Experts reckon a Kia Niro hybrid will be worth between 45 and 49% of its new price at three years/36,000 miles – higher-spec versions losing the most in both percentage and real terms. It’s a decent performance, though, and compares well to rivals.