Renault ZOE (2013-2019) running costs

The Renault ZOE is one of the cheapest electric cars to run, regardless of whether you lease or buy the battery

Renault ZOE
Overall rating

3.5 out of 5

Running costs rating

4.5 out of 5

Price
£29,395 - £33,895
Fuel Type:
Electric
Insurance groupWarrantyService intervalsRoad tax
18-193yrs / 100,000 miles1yr / 18,000 miles£0

Running costs vary depending on whether you lease or buy the battery, of course, but even so the ZOE is very affordable, even by electric-car standards. The battery-included model is good value, although some drivers may find that a used Nissan Leaf is just as good. Renault estimates the ZOE will cost around 2p per mile to charge, while a full charge from a 7kW home charger will cost around £3.

Renault ZOE insurance group

The ZOE falls into insurance groups 18 or 19, which is roughly on a par with petrol or diesel small cars like the Renault Clio. Since many electric-car drivers do low mileage, limited-mileage policies are another way to save a bit on insurance.

Warranty

The ZOE was sold with a three-year, 100,000-mile warranty, while the electric drivetrain (which isn't the same as the battery) was covered for five years and 100,000 miles. You also got three year’s roadside assistance, or if you lease the battery, you get roadside assistance for as long as your lease contract runs.

Servicing

Renault offers a fixed-price ‘EasyLife Pack’ that costs £100 and covers servicing for three years – and it’s transferable if you sell the car. The price shoots up to £400 to extend the servicing and warranty to a fourth year. A service is required every year or 18,000 miles, whichever occurs first – which seems rather over-cautious given the longer service intervals of most electric cars.

Road tax

Electric cars are exempt from road tax, and you also get free entry to the London Congestion Charge zone (and any other such zones that may be introduced in the next few years).

Depreciation

Depreciation is a weak point in the ZOE’s otherwise impressive financial case, as it loses value faster than most other electric cars. There are examples that have lost 60% or more of their new value in three years, while the Nissan Leaf tends to hold onto a bit more of its value.

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