In-depth reviews

Kia e-Niro range, battery & charging

If our experience of living with the Hyundai Kona is anything to go by, the longer-range version of the Kia e-Niro should do 260 miles in normal use

Overall rating

4.5 out of 5

Range, battery & charging rating

4.5 out of 5

Price
£32,195 - £38,995
Fuel Type:
Electric
ModelRangeWallbox charge timeFast charge time
e-Niro 39kWh180 miles6hrs 10mins (7.2kW, 0-100%)57mins (50kW, 0-80%)
e-Niro 64kWh282 miles9hrs 35mins (7.2kW, 0-100%)1hr 15mins (50kW, 0-80%)

The Kia e-Niro impressed us when we ran one as a long-term test car, because it was able to match its claimed range of 282 miles in normal driving – we didn't have to drive slowly or avoid motorways to get the advertised figure in our 64kWh test car.

Initial tests suggest the 39kWh model is just as good in this respect, so you can be more relaxed about the range that's really available. The 39kWh model has a 180-mile claimed range, which is less than some cheaper, smaller electric cars can manage (a Vauxhall Corsa-e can do 211 miles, for example) but could still be a valid option for shorter-distance family transport, and it's just as practical as the longer-range version.

Kia e-Niro range

The Kia e-Niro’s headline 282-mile official range applies for the 64kWh model, while the 39kWh model added to the line-up in 2020 has a 180-mile range. Expect those figures to drop in winter, as with all electric cars, or if you do a lot of motorway miles as higher speeds drain the battery faster. If you spend all your time at low speed, you're even more likely to reach the claimed range for each model.

Charge time

Charging is as straightforward as it gets: you use a CCS or Type 2 cable that fits into a port in the car’s nose. The car comes with a Type 2 charging cable for public points and a three-pin plug for use with a domestic socket. But as with any electric car with a battery this big, charging using the latter method will be extremely slow, with a full top-up taking nearly 30 hours, or 18 hours for the smaller battery.

A 7.2kW home wallbox will do the same in around 10 hours, while a 50kW rapid charger (usually found at motorway services) should give you an 80% charge in an hour and 15 minutes – or 57 minutes for the 39kWh battery. The e-Niro is also capable of taking a 100kW charge, which will do the same top-up in under an hour, regardless of battery size.

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