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In-depth reviews

Nissan Ariya review: running costs & insurance

The Ariya should be reasonably cheap to run and maintain, not to mention a very tempting company-car option

Overall rating

4.0 out of 5

Running costs & insurance rating

4.0 out of 5

Insurance groupWarrantyService intervalAnnual CC cost (20%/40%)
30-433yrs/60,000 miles18,000 milesFrom £159/£317

The Nissan Ariya isn't the cheapest electric family SUV around, but is far from the most expensive we’ve seen – it’s somewhere in the middle of the pack. Thankfully, you’ll be able to save some money when it comes to maintenance, while a rock-bottom Benefit-in-Kind (BiK) tax rate of 2% for all electric cars makes it extremely appealing for company-car drivers.

Nissan Ariya insurance group

The Ariya lands in insurance groups 30 to 43 depending on the exact specification and powertrain you go for, which is about what you’d expect for this kind of electric car. The Hyundai Ioniq 5 attracts very similar ratings, but the VW ID.4 and Skoda Enyaq iV should be less expensive to insure than the Nissan.

Warranty

Like all new Nissans today, the Ariya is covered by a three-year/60,000-mile warranty, while the car’s battery gets an eight year/100,000 mile guarantee. That’s the same basic coverage you get with a Skoda Enyaq iV, but far less than the Hyundai Ioniq 5 or Kia EV6’s five and seven year warranties. You can at least purchase an extended warranty for your Ariya from Nissan once the factory coverage expires. 

Servicing

While petrol or diesel-engined cars might need a good service every year, the Ariya only needs to be looked at every 18,000 miles according to Nissan, which for most people will be nearly two years’ worth of driving. This is because electric cars have far fewer moving parts that need inspection, and as a result you’ll save a good chunk of change compared to running a petrol or diesel car.

Road tax

Like all electric cars, you currently don’t have to pay any road tax (VED) or the London Congestion Charge with the Ariya. However, both exemptions for EVs will come to an end in 2025.

Depreciation

According to the latest industry data, the Nissan Ariya is projected to retain anything between 51 and 54% of its initial asking price over three years and 36,000 miles of ownership. That's slightly better than the Volkswagen ID.4 which'll hold onto 46 and 51% of its value over the same period - a good thing, given the Ariya's higher asking price.

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Welcome one and all, I’m Ellis the news reporter on Auto Express, the brand’s former online reviews editor and contributor to DrivingElectric. I’m proud to say I cut my teeth reporting and reviewing all things EV as the content editor on DrivingElectric. I joined the team while completing my master’s degree in automotive journalism at Coventry University and since then I’ve driven just about every electric car and hybrid I could get my hands on.

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