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Mazda MX-30: interior, dashboard & infotainment

The Mazda MX-30’s posh-feeling interior uses sustainable materials, but is let down by a convoluted infotainment system

Overall rating

3.0 out of 5

Interior, dashboard & comfort rating

4.0 out of 5

Price
£31,495 - £35,895
Fuel Types:
Electric, Petrol

Sustainability is a big point of contention in the car industry right now, which is why Mazda has taken great care when designing the interior of the MX-30. For example, the door panels are made from recycled plastic bottles, while the centre console utilises cork-tree bark (which is also a nod to Mazda’s origins, as it started out over 100 years ago sourcing cork for the shipbuilding industry). You can’t get leather seats, either; top-spec cars get vegan leatherette upholstery, which is also paired with a breathable, sustainable woven fabric.

Mazda MX-30 dashboard

Mazda knows a thing or two about providing the ideal driving position and the MX-30 hits this spot perfectly; it’s low enough to make the car feel sporty, whilst also maintaining a decent and somewhat commanding view of the road ahead. 

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The MX-30 gets part-digital dials, although they mimic a traditional analogue setup. Unfortunately, the information they display is limited to your current speed, road sign information and your level of charge. Compare this to the full-screen sat nav maps available right in your line of sight in some other EVs and it ultimately makes the MX-30 feel a little behind the curve.

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One other curious feature is the Mazda MX-30’s use of a touch screen for the climate control panel, while the infotainment screen is solely controlled by a rotary dial on the centre console. As you might expect, the climate controls can be pretty difficult to operate on the move and a set of physical dials and switches would go some way to alleviate this.

Equipment, options & accessories

Mazda has revamped the MX-30's trim levels since its launch and the range now starts with Prime-Line, which gets 18-inch alloy wheels, black door mirrors, a black grille, and a choice of five colours: Arctic White, Polymetal Grey, Ceramic White, Jet Black and Machine Grey.

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Next up is Exclusive-Line – tipped by Mazda to be the biggest seller, which also has 18-inch alloy wheels, along with powered seats, adjustable lumbar support and smart keyless entry. It adds the option of three-tone exterior finish, with different roof, body and side-panel colours.

The range-topping Makoto features three interior trim options, a dark brown cork console and door grips, a front wiper de-icer, a powered tilting sunroof, a heated steering wheel and a 12-speaker Bose surround-sound audio system.

Infotainment, apps & sat nav

In today’s touchscreen-obsessed climate Mazda’s decision to not add this functionality to the MX-30’s infotainment  Mazda MX-30’s infotainment is curious, especially as this tech is already used for the climate controls. Mazda says that this is because a rotary controller is much safer to operate on the move and whilst many BMW models such as the i4 saloon also have a central-mounted dial controller, drivers can also operate the infotainment via the touchscreen – an overall more simplistic and intuitive manner of operation. Even so, once you get used to the layout of the physical controller there’s no denying you’ll spend less time looking away from the road.

Regardless, Mazda’s infotainment system comes as standard with built-in sat nav, although you can make use of either Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. Mazda also offers its MyMazda app for smartphones. This can be used to control charging, climate-control settings and other options remotely. That’s not to mention the notifications you’ll receive if you forget to charge your MX-30 – a handy feature.

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Hello there, I’m Tom Jervis and I have the pleasure of being the Content Editor here at DrivingElectric. Before joining the team in 2023, I spent my time reviewing cars and offering car buying tips and advice on DrivingElectric’s sister site, Carbuyer. I also continue to occasionally contribute to the AutoExpress magazine – another of DrivingElectric’s partner brands. In a past life, I worked for the BBC as a journalist and broadcast assistant for regional services in the east of England – constantly trying to find stories that related to cars!

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