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Mazda MX-30: performance, motor & drive

It may not be quick, but the Mazda MX-30 is nevertheless enjoyable to drive

Overall rating

3.0 out of 5

Performance, motor & drive rating

4.0 out of 5

Price
£31,495 - £35,895
Fuel Types:
Electric, Petrol

0-62mph

Top speed

Driven wheels

Power

9.7s

87mph

Front

143bhp

Mazda knows how to make a car good to drive: just about every model in its range handles keenly and can keep its driver entertained. The MX-30 is no exception and is amongst the better-driving entry-level electric cars on sale.

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It's typically quiet for a zero-emissions model, but there's also a synthetic 'engine' sound that changes pitch as your speed increases. That might strike some buyers as annoying, but anyone coming from an internal-combustion car will find it entirely natural; it pretty much blends into the background.

Regenerative braking, which is pretty much a given on electric cars these days, is standard. You can adjust the strength of the effect using the paddles between the steering wheel. There are five levels to choose from, ranging from barely perceptible to a strong slowing force when you lift off the accelerator; the latter allows for 'one-pedal' driving, something that isn’t possible on the Mazda’s Vauxhall Mokka Electric rival.

Mazda MX-30 0-62mph, top speed and acceleration

If your only experience with electric cars is driving a Tesla, the Mazda MX-30 will leave a lot to be desired with its 143bhp front-mounted electric motor and relatively conservative 9.7-second 0-62mph time. Saying that, it’s perfectly fine for driving around town; acceleration is relatively nippy from 0-30mph thanks to the near-instant torque available, with things only tailing off as you reach 60mph. This is also the case for many of the Mazda’s rivals, and if you're looking for something a little more brisk at this price point, you’re better-off considering an MG4 or even a Volvo EX30.

Handling

Mazda says the MX-30 is tuned to reflect its ‘Jinba Ittai’ (‘horse and rider as one’) handling philosophy, and we have no reason to doubt that. For starters, its small battery means the MX-30 isn’t quite as heavy as some other electric cars, making it pleasingly fleet-footed on a twisty country road. The steering feels almost as sharp as the brand’s MX-5 sports car, meaning you don’t feel the car’s bulk fighting against you as you take a series of corners. Keen drivers will definitely enjoy this car – that is until they have to find a charging point to top up its tiny battery.

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Hello there, I’m Tom Jervis and I have the pleasure of being the Content Editor here at DrivingElectric. Before joining the team in 2023, I spent my time reviewing cars and offering car buying tips and advice on DrivingElectric’s sister site, Carbuyer. I also continue to occasionally contribute to the AutoExpress magazine – another of DrivingElectric’s partner brands. In a past life, I worked for the BBC as a journalist and broadcast assistant for regional services in the east of England – constantly trying to find stories that related to cars!

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