In-depth reviews

Kia Sportage Hybrid review

The fifth generation of Kia’s mid-size family SUV is a refined cruiser with an impressive infotainment setup, although the ride may be on the firm side for some

Overall rating

4.0 out of 5

Pros

  • Styling
  • Infotainment
  • Cruising refinement

Cons

  • Slightly firm ride
  • More efficient plug-in hybrid to come
  • Pricer than equivalent Hyundai Tucson
Car typeFuel economyCO2 emissions0-62mph
Hybrid49mpg129-146g/km7.7-8.3s

The Kia Sportage has been around for nearly 30 years at this point – almost as long as the South Korean brand has been operating in the UK. It’s even possible to track how Kia has developed over the years by looking back at the four previous generations of the family SUV. The same can be said for the latest iteration of the Sportage.

Standout features include a cutting-edge, tech-filled cabin and bold, striking styling – which is increasingly what we've come to expect from Kia’s line-up, following the high benchmark set by the pure-electric EV6 in 2021. A zero-emissions version of the fifth-generation Sportage isn’t on the horizon, but there are plenty of hybrid powertrain options.

That includes mild-hybrids and, for the first time, a plug-in hybrid version, which will arrive later in 2022. However, we're focusing here on the 'full hybrid', which couples a 1.6-litre turbocharged petrol engine with a 59bhp electric motor, fed by a 1.49kWh battery. The Sportage’s list of rivals includes its sister car, the Hyundai Tucson, as well as the Ford Kuga, Nissan Qashqai, Peugeot 3008, Toyota RAV4 and Vauxhall Grandland.

Total power output for the Sportage Hybrid stands at 227bhp, which is enough to take the front-wheel-drive version with a six-speed-automatic gearbox that we drove from 0-62mph in 7.7 seconds. Cars with four-wheel drive will do the same sprint in just over eight seconds. Both have a top speed of 120mph.

On the road, the full-hybrid Sportage does its best to run on electric power whenever possible, with the engine cutting in smoothly unless you suddenly put your foot down, which sends the revs soaring and unleashes a harsher tone from under the bonnet. A more relaxed approach is rewarded by impressive refinement that makes the Kia comfortable when cruising on the motorway.

All-round visibility has been improved over the previous Sportage, and you now get a chunky, flat-bottomed steering wheel, which is good to hold and gives the family SUV a slightly sporty feel. In fact, when you come face-to-face with some corners, the Sportage grips well and keeps body lean in check. The ride is a little firm, especially when compared to the Tucson, which means the Sportage can be upset by poorer surfaces; although it's not bad enough to count the Kia out just yet.

CO2 emissions stand at between 129 and 132g/km for front-wheel-drive cars like ours, or 140g/km for the all-wheel-drive model. That's on par with the Tucson, as is the hybrid Sportage's fuel economy; we reckon you’d easily get an average of mid to high-40s mpg in everyday driving.

Where this Sportage really shines is inside. Essentially, Kia has lifted the impressive dual-screen infotainment setup from the EV6 electric car almost unchanged. Both 12.3-inch panels – one behind the steering wheel and another central touchscreen – are crisp, responsive and easy to use. There are more controls on the centre console, as well as below the main screen on the changeable panel that allows you to flick between navigation and heating/ventilation control, which is certainly preferable to systems that bury climate controls in sub-menus. The cabin quality overall is top-notch.

There’s space for four six-footers, and even with the panoramic glass roof fitted, those in the rear shouldn’t complain about headroom. Meanwhile, there’s 587 litres of boot capacity, which is not only more than the previous Sportage offered, but around 80 litres up on the latest Nissan Qashqai. You also get a nice, flat floor to make sliding large loads in and out easier. Fold down the rear seats, using the easy-to-access handles on either side of the boot, and space increases to 1,776 litres.

The Sportage Hybrid range starts with GT-Line trim and goes up through 3 and 4 until you reach the range-topping GT-Line S – which also gives you the choice of front or all-wheel-drive. Our test car came in the top-spec trim, priced at nearly £40,000. The amount of kit was impressive, including 18-inch alloys, heated and ventilated front seats, wireless phone charging, an optional two-tone black roof and synthetic leather/suede upholstery. However, it's still more than the equivalent Hyundai Tucson costs.

Our time in the new Sportage Hybrid revealed promising cruising refinement and handling, as well as impressive interior quality, infotainment and cabin space. However, the firm edge to the ride and high pricing compared to its Hyundai sister car may lead potential customers to take a closer look at the Tucson. We reckon the more modest versions, rather than this over-£38,000 range-topping variant, will be the pick of the Sportage Hybrid line-up.

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