In-depth reviews

Toyota C-HR boot space & seating

The Toyota C-HR hybrid is practical enough for small families, but there are more versatile and more spacious SUVs on the market

Overall rating

4.0 out of 5

Boot space, seating & practicality rating

2.5 out of 5

LengthWidthHeightBoot volume
4,385-4,395mm1,795mm1,555mm358-377 litres

It’s fairly obvious that a boxier SUV like the Ford Kuga will be more practical than the swoopy C-HR, however the Toyota is likely to be more than good enough in this respect for most buyers. That roofline cuts into rear headroom a bit, and won’t make bending in to access child seats all that easy, but it’s as good as many hatchbacks.

Toyota C-HR interior space, storage & comfort

There’s plenty of space up front, even for taller adults, and the C-HR's comfortable seats and raised driving position make for a relaxing experience at the wheel. There’s also lots of storage space to keep life’s paraphernalia out of sight.

Getting three people in the back seats will be a real squeeze, but two should be fine as long as they’re not particularly tall. While there’s not a huge amount of knee room in the back, there’s enough space under the front seats for rear passengers to tuck their feet away, which helps to a degree.

If you’ve got small children, you should make sure they’re okay with the high windowline, as they might not be able to see out too well and it can feel a bit claustrophobic. The roofline can make it quite easy to bump your head when you’re leaning in to buckle children up, as well. This is far from the best family car – a standard hatchback like the Volkswagen Golf will be usefully more practical.

Boot space

The C-HR's boot is pretty small by the standards of the class – fractionally smaller, in fact, than a Volkswagen Golf’s, and a lot smaller than a SEAT Ateca’s. The 1.8-litre musters up 377 litres of luggage space with the rear seats up, while the 2.0-litre model only manages 358 litres. The 60:40 split-folding rear seats don’t lie totally flat, while the folding mechanism is accessed from the rear seats, not the boot, and there’s also a fairly pronounced load lip.

Ultimately, the C-HR isn't terribly practical by SUV standards. A Skoda Karoq, which is more spacious, has flexible seating and many nifty touches to store your things and make life easy, will be a more useful family SUV in every way. The C-HR will do the job for most small families, mind, and many will feel the practicality shortfalls are outweighed by the car’s style swagger.

Most Popular

New Polestar 3 electric SUV priced from £79,845
Polestar 3
News

New Polestar 3 electric SUV priced from £79,845

Specs for the first Polestar SUV have surfaced online, with the Tesla Model X rival boasting a 380-mile range from its 111kWh battery
20 Sep 2022
Top 10 best electric cars 2022
Best electric cars 2022
Best cars

Top 10 best electric cars 2022

Here, we run through our favourite new electric cars that you can buy right now in the UK…
21 Sep 2022
Top 10 best seven-seater electric and hybrid cars 2022
Best seven-seater electric and hybrids
Best cars

Top 10 best seven-seater electric and hybrid cars 2022

If the regular crop of electrified SUVs and family cars don’t provide enough practicality for you, then take a closer look at the range of electric an…
12 Sep 2022