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In-depth reviews

Renault Megane E-Tech review: boot space, seating & practicality

Boot space is better than you’ll get in a Volkswagen ID.3, but rear legroom is a bit tight for taller passengers

Overall rating

4.5 out of 5

Boot space, seating & practicality rating

4.0 out of 5

LengthWidthHeightBoot volume (seats up/down)
4,210mm1,780mm1,500mm440/1,332 litres

At its thinnest point, the Megane E-Tech’s battery is just 110mm tall; the slimmest in its segment according to Renault, and 70mm thinner than ZOE’s. The thicker parts are placed beneath the rear passenger seats in order to make the most of the cabin space, while pushing the wheels out to the corners of the car also help in this department. Unfortunately the small windows and steeply raked windscreen can make the cabin feel quite dark at times, and as a result, not as airy as its rivals.

Renault Megane E-Tech interior space, storage & comfort

While it might feel a little gloomy at times, the Megane E-Tech’s cabin is still very spacious and comes with plenty of storage space up front. There’s a tray for your smartphone, which in all but the base model features a wireless charging pad, plus various cubbies in the centre console and underneath the armrest. Though curiously, there is just one cupholder. The glove box is also a decent size, and the large door bins are lined with fabric so none of your odds and ends will rattle around in there. 

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Headroom all around is very good, though we would still say that rear kneeroom isn’t as generous as we found in the taller and longer Kia Niro EV and Volkswagen ID.3. There is a set of air vents for rear passengers, but no cup holders or armrest. We also found that because of the size of the door openings, and how low the Renault sits, some taller people have to duck down to get in the car. 

Boot space

Boot space in the Renault tops out at 440 litres, which is about 60 litres more than you get in the VW ID.3 or Cupra Born, and nearly 100 litres more than in the MG4 EV. There’s even a little storage space under the boot floor for your charging cables, just no ‘frunk’ because of the components under the bonnet.

Because there’s no electric motor on the rear axle the boot itself is very deep. However that also means you have to lift stuff over a huge load lip and the boot floor isn’t adjustable. There’s more space available with the rear seats folded down, but again, because of how deep the boot lip, the load space isn’t flat, which could make loading longer items like a bicycle a bit difficult. 

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Welcome one and all, I’m Ellis the news reporter on Auto Express, the brand’s former online reviews editor and contributor to DrivingElectric. I’m proud to say I cut my teeth reporting and reviewing all things EV as the content editor on DrivingElectric. I joined the team while completing my master’s degree in automotive journalism at Coventry University and since then I’ve driven just about every electric car and hybrid I could get my hands on.

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