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In-depth reviews

Mercedes EQS review: boot space, seating & practicality

Cabin space up front is generous, but the EQS falls well short of the Mercedes S-Class when it comes to rear-seat comfort

Overall rating

3.5 out of 5

Boot space, seating & practicality rating

3.5 out of 5

LengthWidthHeightBoot volume (seats up/down)
5,261mm1,926mm1,512mm610/1,750 litres

Unlike the Mercedes EQA, EQB and EQC SUVs, which are based on the same platforms as combustion-engined counterparts, the EQS was designed from the ground up as an electric car. In fact, it’s the first car to be built on Mercedes' 'EVA' modular platform for large electric cars, which will also underpins the E-Class-sized EQE saloon.

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You might expect that to work wonders for interior packaging, and while up front the EQS feels really spacious, in the back it’s a different story. The sloping roofline – designed as such to maximise the car’s aerodynamic efficiency – really eats into headroom. If you’re looking for a chauffeur car to carry passengers in the rear seats, then the BMW i7 – or indeed, Merc’s very own EQS SUV – is a better choice.

Mercedes EQS interior space, storage & comfort

Overall, the space in the EQS is fairly generous, which is what you’d expect from a car that's not only trying to exceed the expectations of S-Class owners, but is also 5.22 metres long and 1.93 metres wide.

However, the EQS doesn’t offer S-Class levels of rear-seat room, as a result of its sleek shape and low roofline. Six-foot-tall adults will struggle to get comfortable thanks to the reduced headroom, though legroom is no problem whatsoever. There’s loads of space for your feet, too, thanks to the almost completely flat floor.

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Admittedly, the lack of headroom is also an issue in the Porsche Taycan and Audi e-tron GT, both of which get a similarly-sleek design. The boxier BMW i7 rules the roost if you want to carry rear-seat passengers on a regular basis.

Boot space

When it comes to boot space, the EQS is a bit more accommodating with a whopping 610 litres on offer – even more than the big BMW iX SUV. The hatchback tailgate does make loading the Mercedes far easier than its rivals, but there’s no 'frunk' compartment in the EQS like you get in a Tesla Model S, Porsche Taycan or Audi e-tron GT, which is a shame. Lower the rear seats and luggage space expands to 1,750 litres.

Those looking for even more space could be well served by the newer Mercedes EQS SUV, which not only offers room for seven people, but also up to 880 litres of boot space depending on how you position the middle row of seats.

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Richard is editor of DrivingElectric, as well as sister site Carbuyer.co.uk, and a regular contributor to Auto Express. An electric and hybrid car advocate, he spent more than five years working on the news and reviews desk at Auto Express and has driven almost every new car currently on sale.

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