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In-depth reviews

Audi A7 hybrid performance, top speed & engine

The Audi A7 TFSI e offers plenty of pace, even if it isn’t a match for the diesel and petrol-powered A7s when it comes to driver engagement

Overall rating

3.5 out of 5

Performance, engine & drive rating

3.5 out of 5

0-62mphTop speedDriven wheelsPower
5.7-6.3s155mphFour295-362bhp

Let’s get one thing straight: the Audi A7 TFSI e is no slouch. Prod the accelerator and the rate at which it gathers speed (regardless of engine choice) is impressive. On the subject of engines, the less powerful 50 TFSI e four-cylinder petrol is claimed to produce 295bhp and the more potent 55 TFSI e makes 362bhp.

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Despite these outputs, the plug-in A7 models don’t feel quite as effortlessly fast as the 3.0-litre diesel-engined A7s. This is mostly due to the hybrids using a smaller four-cylinder petrol engine, which sounds strained rather than characterful when pushed hard. In addition, the dual-clutch automatic gearbox can be a little jerky, which can make driving less relaxing.

Audi A7 hybrid 0-62mph, top speed and acceleration

Starting with the more powerful 55 TFSI e version, its healthy power output gives it a 0-62mph time of 5.7 seconds (which is quick, but not as quick as a plug-in Volvo S90's 4.8 seconds) and an electronically limited top speed of 155mph. The 50 TFSI e model has a claimed 0-62mph time of 6.3 seconds and a top speed also limited to 155mph.

Handling

While the A7’s steering is nicely weighted, it isn't really communicative enough to satisfy a keen driver. In deference to the car’s sporty character, ride quality isn't pillow-soft and the larger the alloy-wheel size you pick, the worse it’ll be. In truth, the A7 TFSI e shines most when running solely on battery power. Those with a commute up to around 20 miles can enjoy the entire journey in electric mode (including faster stretches on dual-carriageways or motorways).

In doing so, they can make the most of Audi’s clever hybrid technology – including using navigation data to help maximise range. Then again, if you can regularly charge you car, there could be a case for going fully electric with something like an Audi e-tron GT or Tesla Model S.

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