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In-depth reviews

Skoda Enyaq: performance, motor & drive

Although not as fast or fun as some electric cars, the Enyaq is a safe and predictable car to drive; ride quality could be better, however

Overall rating

4.5 out of 5

Performance, motor & drive rating

4.0 out of 5

Model

0-62mph

Top speed

Driven wheels

Power

Enyaq 60

8.7s

99mph

Rear

177bhp

Enyaq 85

6.7s

112mph

Rear

282bhp

Enyaq 80x

6.6s

112mph

Four

282bhp

Enyaq vRS

5.5s

112mph

Four

335bhp

You can forget Tesla Model S or Porsche Taycan-challenging traffic-light getaways: the Enyaq has been tuned to deliver a more relaxing driving experience – and for many that'll be just right. There’s still plenty of poke for overtaking and keeping up with faster-moving traffic; the Skoda just doesn’t goad you into driving like a hooligan.

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Even in rear-wheel-drive guise, it feels safe and predictable, with plenty of grip and accurate steering. There’s not much body roll and the brakes are strong. Speaking of the brakes, the regenerative braking setup isn’t as strong as you’ll find in some electric cars, but it can be adjusted using the steering-wheel paddles, which is a handy touch and something you don’t get in its Volkswagen ID.4 sister car. Note these paddles are only standard on some specs, however.

Skoda Enyaq 0-62mph, top speed and acceleration

Skoda’s latest update for the Enyaq has boosted power across the board – that is, apart from the entry-level 60 model, which still puts out 177bhp. Still, this is enough for 0-62mph in 8.7 seconds,which is more than sufficient for city driving, especially given the Enyaq – like most EVs – delivers the majority of its torque instantly, meaning the sprint from 0-30mph is much faster than you might expect.

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The newly-renamed Skoda Enyaq 85 boasts a hefty 81bhp increase on its ‘80’ predecessor, resulting in a total output of 282bhp. The four-wheel-drive 80x model has an identical power output, despite having an additional electric motor on the front axle; both models take just over six-and-a-half seconds to reach 62mph and offer a more than plentiful amount of poke, allowing for smooth and effortless motorway overtakes.

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But if you’re looking to complete the school run in record time, the Enyaq vRS turns the wick up even further. It also uses a dual-motor setup, but pumps out a total of 335bhp. The 0-62mph sprint is dispatched in 5.5 seconds, which makes the hot Enyaq the fastest production Skoda model ever. That being said, the Enyaq’s relaxed nature does make the excessive power of the vRS model seem somewhat superfluous.

Every version gets the usual array of Eco, Normal and Sport driving modes, but the four-wheel drive Enyaq 85x and vRS models also feature a 'Traction' driving mode. This increases ASR (Anti-Slip Regulation) to provide optimal drive distribution between the front and rear axle – perfect for wet and snowy weather.

Handling

Refinement is excellent; this is easily the quietest Skoda we’ve ever been in – even road- and wind noise seem to be kept at bay on all but the roughest surfaces. In fact, the only area where things seem to come undone is with regards to ride quality. The Enyaq is available with up to 21-inch wheels but even on our test car’s 20s, it was a bit firm to be considered comfortable. The ride is at its worst at lower speeds, with things improving the faster you go and/or if you specify the optional adaptive dampers setup, which can soften the suspension at the push of a button.

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Elsewhere, while the relaxed power delivery means the Skoda doesn’t goad you into driving quickly, if you do find yourself on your favourite road then there is some fun to be had. Body control is good and the steering is nicely weighted. For an SUV it feels pretty agile. The brakes are strong, too. One final positive about the driving experience is that the boxy shape gives great all-round visibility. No matter which way you’re looking – front, back, or over the shoulder – you know exactly where the car is placed on the road.

Skoda has fitted sports suspension to the Enyaq vRS, dropping the ride height by 15mm at the front and 10mm at the rear. This, combined with the optional 21-inch wheels on the one we drove, did cause a few more jolts to filter through into the cabin than in the regular Enyaq, but it's never uncomfortable. Sadly, the slight compromise in ride quality doesn’t result in equal gains in driving dynamics.

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Richard is editor of DrivingElectric, as well as sister site Carbuyer.co.uk, and a regular contributor to Auto Express. An electric and hybrid car advocate, he spent more than five years working on the news and reviews desk at Auto Express and has driven almost every new car currently on sale.

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