Range Rover PHEV running costs

The Range Rover PHEV can be amazingly cheap to run, for a Range Rover…

The Range Rover isn’t a cheap car, and the hybrid isn’t the cheapest version. However, although prices for the PHEV start at the best part of £90,000 and top out at almost double that, this plug-in hybrid isn’t outrageously expensive by Range Rover standards. In fact, it’s only about £6,000 dearer than the diesel-engined TDV6 model.

Ultimately, there are two ways to look at the PHEV. It’s very luxurious when you compare it to the likes of the Volvo XC90 and Audi Q7, so you may think that justifies the extra outlay. But, on the other hand, if you just want a low-emission prestige SUV, both the Audi and Volvo work out as around £20,000 cheaper.

In the Range Rover PHEV's favour, it has CO2 emissions as low as 72g/km and combined fuel economy of up to 91.1mpg, which translate into far lower running costs than on any other Range Rover. However, when you compare them to the Audi and Volvo’s, they look far higher, especially if you’re looking at the long-wheelbase model.

Still, those low CO2 emissions mean that this version of the Range Rover is exempt from the London Congestion Charge and incurs BiK tax at a rate of just 16%. That’s amazingly low for a Range Rover, although again company-car users will pay far less tax with either the Volvo or Audi.

Range Rover PHEV insurance group

You may baulk at an insurance group rating of 50 – the highest possible – but by Range Rover standards, that’s nothing too exorbitant. Every Range Rover sits in at least group 45, and the cost to insure this PHEV will be no worse than several other Range Rovers. However, things don’t look so rosy when you compare it to other prestige-badged SUVs, such as the Volvo XC90 and Audi Q7. Both sit in much lower insurance groups.

Warranty

As with any Land Rover vehicle, the PHEV is covered by a three-year/unlimited-mileage warranty. However, under the usual terms, it doesn’t cover wear and tear and will be void if you don’t service your car according to the proper schedules.

If you want to, when the new-car warranty runs out, you can buy an extended warranty, which will cover the car up to 10 years old or 100,000 miles, whichever is sooner. Overall, that level of cover is very much on a par with what you will find on any of the car’s most obvious rivals.

Servicing

How often a service is needed on a Range Rover is dictated by how you drive the car. On a diet on lots of short journeys, you can expect to be sent to your local dealer more frequently than if you spend more time at a steady cruise on the motorway.

With most Range Rover and Land Rover models, you can pay a one-off fee up front to cover up to five years’ servicing, but this isn’t available on the Range Rover.

Road tax

If you’re hoping that the money-saving possibilities on the PHEV will include lower rates of road tax, you’ll be disappointed. Only zero-emission cars qualify for exemption from road tax, which means that the Range Rover will cost £130 each year. But, because the list price of every model is in excess of £40,000, you also have to pay the £310 annual surcharge the first five times you tax it, for a total of £440 a year.

Depreciation

Range Rovers are as desirable on the used market as they are as new cars, and that translates into strong values being retained as they age. After three years and 36,000 miles, even with its new technology, any PHEV is expected to be worth just over half what it cost new – which is pretty impressive and marginally better than you'd get back on an Audi Q7. The one exception is the most expensive SVAutobiography model, which retains a lower proportion of its value when new.