Skip advert
Advertisement

New 2022 Range Rover hybrid: prices, specs and details

The all-new Range Rover PHEV starts at £103,485 in the UK; a fully electric version of the luxury SUV will follow in 2024

Land Rover has revealed further details and pricing for the plug-in hybrid versions of the fifth-generation Range Rover. The electrified variants of the Aston Martin DBX and Bentley Bentayga rival start from £103,485, for the less powerful P440e model in entry-level SE trim.

Advertisement - Article continues below

The P440e is also available in HSE (£109,425), Autobiography (£122,765) and First Edition (£127,105) specifications. There's also the more powerful P510e, which is available only in Autobiography, First Edition and lavish SV specifications, running from £126,455 to £149,400. Orders for all versions are being taken now.

The latest Range Rover is the first Land Rover product to use the brand’s MLA-Flex platform, which has been designed to suit combustion-engine, plug-in hybrid and fully electric powertrains. The pure-electric version of the new Range Rover won’t be making its debut until in 2024, however.

New Range Rover hybrid: engines and performance

While a zero-emissions Range Rover is still a few years away, the latest iteration of the luxury SUV is available with two plug-in hybrid powertrain options. Both combine a 3.0-litre straight-six turbocharged petrol engine with a 141bhp electric motor that’s fed by a 38.2kWh battery. In the P440e model, this combination produces 434bhp and 620Nm of torque. The P510e version gets a more powerful petrol engine, offering drivers 503bhp and 700Nm of torque, as well as a 0-62mph time of 5.6 seconds.

Advertisement - Article continues below
Skip advert
Advertisement
Skip advert
Advertisement - Article continues below

Top speed in EV mode is 87mph and official testing has returned a longer electric driving range than was initially estimated – 70 miles instead of 62 – and CO2 emissions as low as 18g/km. The manufacturer says customers can count on up to 54 miles of electric range in most real-world situations; enough, it reckons, for typical Range Rover buyers to complete 75% of their journeys on electric power alone. With 50kW rapid charging capability, a 0-80% top up will take less than an hour from a fast enough charging point, while recharging the Range Rover’s battery from flat will take around five hours if you use a home wallbox.

In addition to the EV driving mode, the car’s default setting is Hybrid mode, which blends both power sources automatically and uses geofencing to ensure drivers can travel on electric power in low-emissions zones. Meanwhile, Save mode ensures the car retains a pre-programmed level of charge for use later in a journey.

Advertisement - Article continues below

All versions of the Range Rover – including the mild-hybrid petrol, diesel and V8 petrol – have an eight-speed automatic transmission with low-range capability and Land Rover’s four-wheel-drive system with Terrain Response 2. According to Land Rover, the Intelligent All-Wheel Drive system is able to decouple the front axle on-road between 21 and 100mph to improve efficiency and reduce CO2 emissions by up to 4g/km.

Styling, interior and technology

The latest Range Rover is a subtle evolution of the previous model's design, retaining its iconic, boxy proportions. The front-end styling has been refreshed, featuring sharper digital LED headlights and the sensors for the car’s driver assistance systems incorporated in the panel lower down in the bumper. 

Skip advert
Advertisement
Skip advert
Advertisement - Article continues below

The most substantial styling change is at the rear, which now features a full-width black panel that houses both the indicators and vertical tail-lights, as well as becoming opaque when the car is switched off. There’s still a split tailgate as well, while alloy-wheel designs between 20 and 23 inches in diameter are offered.

Advertisement - Article continues below

Inside, the Range Rover gets a 13.1-inch central touchscreen running the latest version of Land Rover’s Pivi Pro infotainment system. According to the brand, 90% of tasks and functions are just two steps from the home screen, plus connectivity sees improvements thanks to over-the-air (OTA) software updates, Alexa virtual assistant integration, wireless Apple CarPlay and wireless Android Auto.

Behind the wheel is a 13.7-inch digital driver’s display, while customers can also opt for the ‘Rear Seat Entertainment’ package, which adds a pair of 11.4-inch high-definition touchscreens mounted to the front seatbacks. Leather-free upholstery options are also available.

The flagship SUV also features active noise cancellation, plus electronic air suspension that uses navigation data to set up the car for roads ahead. All-wheel steering is also standard, with the rear wheels able to turn up to seven degrees, meaning the five-metre-long Range Rover has a turning circle of just 10.95 metres.

Prices, versions and trim levels

The P440e plug-in hybrid is available in either short-wheelbase (SWB) or long-wheelbase (LWB) form, starting at £103,485 for the former. It's offered in three regular trim levels (SE, HSE and Autobiography), with a First Edition model on sale for the first year of production. The P510e powertrain meanwhile is only available in loftier Autobiography, First Edition and range-topping SV trims, and in short-wheelbase form only. Full pricing is as follows:

ModelOn-the-road price
P440e SE (SWB)£103,485
P440e HSE (SWB)£109,425
P440e Autobiography (SWB)£122,765
P440e First Edition (SWB)£127,105
P440e Autobiography (LWB)£125,335
P440e First Edition (LWB)£126,755
P510e Autobiography (SWB)£126,455
P510e First Edition (SWB)£128,055
P510e SV (SWB)£149,400

The SV is offered in two design themes: Serenity features bronze accents inside and out, along with mosaic-pattern embroidery, while the Intrepid is a sportier, driver-focused theme, with darker trim and the option of single or dual-tone leather. 

Skip advert
Advertisement

Welcome one and all, I’m Ellis the news reporter on Auto Express, the brand’s former online reviews editor and contributor to DrivingElectric. I’m proud to say I cut my teeth reporting and reviewing all things EV as the content editor on DrivingElectric. I joined the team while completing my master’s degree in automotive journalism at Coventry University and since then I’ve driven just about every electric car and hybrid I could get my hands on.

Skip advert
Advertisement

Recommended

Get ready Mayfair: the Range Rover Electric is coming in 2024
Range Rover Electric - rear
News

Get ready Mayfair: the Range Rover Electric is coming in 2024

13 Dec 2023
Top 10 slowest-depreciating electric and hybrid cars 2023
Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo x2
Best cars

Top 10 slowest-depreciating electric and hybrid cars 2023

10 May 2023

Most Popular

New Dacia Spring has landed and could be UK’s first really cheap electric car
Dacia Spring reveal - front
News

New Dacia Spring has landed and could be UK’s first really cheap electric car

Dacia Spring is coming to the UK with a new face, upgraded tech and a potential starting price of £16k
21 Feb 2024
New Ineos Fusilier plugs the ‘electric Land Rover Defender’ gap in the market
Ineos Fusilier
News

New Ineos Fusilier plugs the ‘electric Land Rover Defender’ gap in the market

Ineos’ first electric off-roader has been revealed and looks very much like the larger, petrol-powered Grenadier
23 Feb 2024
New cheap Vauxhall Corsa Electric YES Edition says ‘no’ to expensive EV prices
Vauxhall Corsa Electric YES Edition - front
News

New cheap Vauxhall Corsa Electric YES Edition says ‘no’ to expensive EV prices

New entry-level Vauxhall Corsa Electric arrives with exclusive red paintwork and a £5,500 cheaper starting price
23 Feb 2024