Lexus CT 200h interior & comfort

Peerless build quality and upmarket materials lift an otherwise dated interior in the Lexus CT 200h

A 2017 makeover improved matters, but the CT 200h still lags behind its rivals when it comes to the quality of the infotainment system and dashboard design. Yet, despite this, quality remains high and it retains an air of exclusivity and individuality.

Lexus CT 200h dashboard

For a model that dates back to 2011, the layout and quality of finish remains impressive, even if the dashboard is showing its age in some key areas. It helps that the interior was given a makeover at the end of 2017, designed to add a few more years to the life of an ageing product. There’s a lot to take in – this isn’t a minimalist or simplistic dashboard. Some will like the sheer size of the dashboard, while others could feel hemmed in.

Equipment, options and accessories

The Lexus CT 200h range was slimmed down in late 2018 and now encompasses just three trim levels: CT, F Sport and Takumi.

As standard, all CT 200h models come with the Lexus Safety System+ package, incorporating a pre-collision system, lane-keeping assistance, adaptive cruise control, automatic high beams and sway warning. The entry-level CT features 17-inch alloy wheels, sat nav, a reversing camera, rear parking sensors, dual-zone climate control and rain-sensing wipers.

F Sport adds its own design of alloy wheel, plus a special F Sport grille, steering wheel and pedals. It also gets black mirror housings, sports suspension, heated front seats, an auto-dimming rear-view mirror and rear privacy glass.

Takumi features a sunroof, LED headlights a premium navigation system, a premium Mark Levinson stereo and parking sensors at the front as well as the rear.

Infotainment, apps & sat nav

In stark contrast to many of the more modern systems, the infotainment sticks out from the top of the dashboard rather than being integrated into the centre console. Most models have a seven-inch colour display operated by a rotary dial control, while the Takumi benefits from a larger 10.3-inch display controlled by a touch interface.

In both cases, the quality of the display lags behind the competition, while the control mechanisms are fiddly and far from intuitive. We’d even argue that you’ll spend more time with your eyes off the road when trying to find the desired option on the display.